Morrison's Pensions


Thomas Machin Papers
(Terrible handwriting, best to see if Jim Morrison can figure out more of these lengthy papers.)

Albany July 31, 1779
Dr. Sir
            Your favor of the 27 Inst. Is come to hand.  I am happy to find that you enjoy your health.
            Nothing could have been more unexpected than to be taxed with and attention to your Letter when I immediately answered then on my arrival here in behalf of my Father who is a? that time was extremely ill, and since unexpectedly fell a victim to his disorder—He suddenly expired the 13th of this month and have left us to lament the loss of an affectionate and indulgent Parent—A loss rendered still more severe by the situation of the times.  You, who have a sympathizing heart no doubt will feel for us—The dispensations of In[?]dense, since our Retreat have been severe—that I trust that our support will be equal to the Tryalls [sic] we undergo.
            I apprehend the Western plans will fall through—and your will return [rest of page cut off] New Windsor when I shall expect to hear you and be assured that your favors will be acceptable to Dear Sir.  Your Loyal Obed Humble servant, Henry Rutgers
            P.S. The ladies desire their compn.
Capt. Machin

Can’t read date or place.
            Mr. Tappan informs me that you have again carried home the old muster rolls there is a return call for which cannot be made out till you arrive or send the roll the Adjutant is waiting for the Return of your company therefore don’t [?] of sending or brining these yourself.
            Wave my Compliments to your lady and believe me most devontly, Your Obed Hum’d Sev’t Woodward.

The Barracks, 1st February 1783.
Dr. Sir
            Your friendly polite & agreeable letter of the 17th withto came safe to hand, the contents of which gave me real pleasure but it was mixed with pain, f r it made me reflect on the length of time that has passed since you have favored me with a line, I grant on affairs of so much consequence as the Choice of a partner for life ought & no doubt did take up much of your time & intention, but since a few minutes in the course of several Months might have been devoted to a Friend, but is complaining is a disagreeable subject leave it, & beg leave to assure you and I sincerely congratulate you on your change of Condition & would be very happy to be acquainted with the Lady whose merit has intitled her to the first place in so good a heart so that of my Friend Machin, you see I take it for granted that merit & nothing else induced you to fix for life.-- --
           
Your tender feelings for your ‘old Friends’, I highly approve of, but as for Miss P----- not one word will I hear on the subject I cannot allow you even to thing----very hard you will say, but remember at the same time in an old [?] experienced Friend that says so, I think [can’t read a line] they are so quick of conception & withal so very nice in that point that a thought of another person once dear to you hardly escapes them, if I esteemed you less than I do I should not have said so much on so nice a subject—I am pleased with the prospect of a visit from you & your spouse pray let it be as soon as convenient for we talk of removing to the Country some time in April where is yet uncertain.  I have given the contents of your order to Mr. Mr. Nesbit. [Philadelphia Merchant] And have a hundred things to say to you but at present am inspired no in a humour for writing them, so I desire you will come & see us & give me an opportunity to tell you personally how much I am.  Sir your real Friend & very humble Servant.  E. Porter
            Colonel Porter joins me in abundance of love & Compliments to yourself & Lady, Genl Clinton & his Lady &c &c &c.

New York 19th October 1784
Dear Sir
            I have not yet laid in any wood for winter as may depend once on your providing it for me agreeable to your Promise, repeated to Mrs. Clinton when she saw you in Kingston—It is not high Time that I was supplied This Cole Weather is fast advancing & it may soon be difficult to procure it, even at every advanced & Since I request therefore that you will not delay sending it and be pleased to let me hear from you on the [?] by the very first Conveyance as it will relieve me from some anxiety & Suspense to be assured that nothing has inter?  to occasion a Disappointment—My compliments to the Mrs. Machin & believe Me your Friend & Humble Servt.  Geor. Clinton
Capt. Thomas Machlin

Camden, May 4th 1782
Dr. Sir
            I shall not make any apology for breaking in upon your retirement at this time—the intimacy that hath subsisted between I hope will be sufficient—a short amount of our situation and that of the country is the subject of my story.
            A supernumerary quantity of Artillery & min indered the General to leave two of our Companies & their pieces at this place—our situation at first was rather disagreeable but upon consideration that no fault of ours had occasioned it—but that it was the common fortune of war—Our station soon became familiar—balls assembly’s & several desertions because more frequent, as our acquaintance enlarg’d contentment aided the furtive success while with social mirth & a Temperate clime we eluded the piercing blasts of Boisterous winter--& vimal flowers covered the fruitfull  plain before me thought the verbose [?] ware half expended.
            All nature now looks gay—the fields covered with virdense and the woods with odouiferous perfumes & friendly shades afford a [?] from busy cares -- & a fit asylum for studious contemplation.  From this romantic description you may probably entertain a high opinion of the place—a short geographical perhaps may at your right.—Camden (or Pine Tree) is situated a mile N. of the Wateru? River—some distance above it is called the Katawba & forty miles below on the Junction of the Congru it is called Santa—it then becomes a Capital River & empties into the sea fifty miles N. of Chalreston & ten S. of George Town—Camden has been a fine village supported chiefly by trade The River being navigable for large boats—but is now reduced to a very few homes it has been in possession of the British near a year—They had it fortified by a line of stockades round the Town flanked by seven redoubts---in distance from harbor is about 120 miles—the country at some distance is little [?] but Banon? fine land but on the river it is extremely rich & well settled—its situation is rather low and the great Quantity of stagnated water under is unhealthy—especially near the river there the only good land is almost all the country below this place has that disadvantage—the land is rich but often almost the whole face of the country is covered by water—the army has deficiently in finding dry ground to encamp on--& the method of cultivating their land by keeping the river fields under water add greatly to render the air unwholesome.
            The people in general are gay & hospitable The own large possessions but seldom live long to enjoy them—a man of sixty in the low Country is very rare—here are widows plenty—Gen. Green lives near Dorchester town by river from Charleston—his farm is small & very bad [?] provided for—particular in clothing—but they are very healthy & in good spirits—the enemy soldiers venture out & desertion are very frequent among them General Mospree? Is in Georgeia & has gained some late advantages over the [?] at Savanna.
            My paper tell me I must stop—should be happy in a Correspondence with you at [bad spot] [?] with you—present by best respects to Gresion, Woodward & all the gentlemen of the Regt, Capt. Ferguson & McClure & duty present their compliment to you—they are all they officers that are here.
            Believe me to be your old friends.  R. Parker

New York 9th Novm 1784.
Dear Sir.
            The wood you sent me is just now delivering the sloop came down on Friday; but before she discharged that other part of her Cargo the present Basis return which I presume has delayed her something—I will give my receipt to the Boatman (Skipper) for the number of loads and agreeable to your Request pay the amount to Capt. Flessing on his calling for it which I concluded now have directed him to do—I am sorry you have been put to by my Inconsequency in getting the wood down as I could have easilly supplied myself here had I not depended on being provided by your—It is now however too late and I must pay on for what I shall still want—If you can (besides what I have now received), furnish me fifteen cord it will suffice—if you cannot certainly do this let me know it & precisely how much I may depend on by the very first opportunity that I may endeavour ton make up the Deficiency here.
            I wish you could procure me a snug Wheel-Barrow & send it to.  I want it in my garden—I am glad to hear your workers are in such forwardness & sincerely wish they may answer your Expectation I fear most your spending too much in the first [?] instance & in this case the Profits may not Justify it by [part can’t be read] the intent for you & care & Laborer, but of this you [part can’t be read] another with Jude.
            How [can’t read this part] ?reties of different kinds – To ask among you do [?] continue to dispose of them & what Rate.  This is information I wish to have from different [Can’t read part of it] will you give it me from your by [?] Conveyance
            Mrs. Clinton joins in Respects to Mrs. Machin with Dr. Sir
Your Most Obed. Servt  Geo Clinton.
Capt. Machin

Little Britain 11th December 1784
My Dear Sir
            I returned from New York last Evening and expect to go there again in a few Days.
            The Governor has for some times been wanting a Secretary for Colo. Malher is married and entered in the Merchantile business and has given me an Invitation to live with him this Winter and Officiate in that Canacter which I will with Chearfulness acceptons I think it will be very advantageous to me—
            I did intend to wait on your before I left the Country if you had not wrote to me as I wish to settle with you in any manner convenient to me—
            I am very [?] it is not in my power to send you some cash by the bearer but you may rely on my seeing you soon for the purpose also mentioned—My Father left home this morning for New Windsor and is not yet returned—Please to present my compliments very respectfully to Mrs.Machin.
            I am My Dear Sir with Sentiment of Esteam your Friend  G? Clinton
Captain Machin

New York May 25th 1785
Dear Sir:
            You will believe me when I tell you that I was very happy to meet our old friend Peter Nestle here and that it would have been greatly augmented had you been with him—Since I left you I have been at Delham except Six Months which I spent in the West India.  I have not as yet been able to fix in any business—Am bound from this place to Boston tomorrow and from thence, shall return immediately to New Haven where I propose spending the summer unless I find some unexpected opportunity of going into business—Six days a gone I was at Hopewell and had once concluded to make you a visit but found it impossible for want of time as some affairs of importance hurried me back to New Haven—I had forgot to inform you that I live with a Merchant in Boston five of six months and believe I should have do ne very well had he not have failed as he was an old friend of mine and was supposed to help me—[Letter ends here]

Phila Octr26 1781
Dear Tommy
            I have long waited with anxious expectancy of Receiving a Letter from you; but at length find myself disappointed; & yet cannot account for it—It is time you may be loaded with Laurels, but from my Observation of Manking I have Witherto, on such occasions, found the Turk? Run more free in their Pen & their Invention much Improved:--But candor & my high opinion of your generosity & friendly disposition induceth me to fix the most favourable construction on my disappointment; by attributing it to miscarriage; or the great hurry of business in matters of more importance—but hope with a Leisure Hour presents itself, to be favoured with a few lines—The great & Glorious News from you Quarter has gladdened the Hart of every Whig—Discharging of ?non from the Ships & on Shore Luminations.  Fire works, breaking Quakd & Tories Windows for Non-Lumination: Huzza: Huzza: Huzza: What pleasing sensations must you Brave Heros feel in making a Divil of the poor Lord & his Army—go on & prosper—peach must follow—such long strides will soon overtake that bright goodess—my dear fellow you intimated an Intention to Wed & browse on the Luxuriant Protuberance of Matrimony; If you still continue of the same opinion, I shall endeavour to have a Lady provided; that on your return the Marriage Ceremony may be performed with expedition--- --- --- ---
            Province Island Money is at 1 1/3 for 1 Hard the late emissions at 3 for one hard—
            We soon expect to hear of an engagement between the French & British Fleets, it is said they were seen within  a few Leagues of each other--- Various are the Conjectures here respecting your future movements, some are so sanguine as to expect an attack will be made on New York this Campaign—and all agree that Charlestown must soon share the fate of York—so you see every thing is planed & you have nothing to do but Execute
            I Pray Write me a long letter—present my most repectfull Compliments to my Brother Officers and believe me to be with every Sentiment of Friendship & Esteem.
            Dear Tommy,  Your Obedient Servt Andrew Porter
Capt. Thomas Machine

            “At a Council of Appointment held at Kingston the 12th of March 1783.
            Present.  His Excellancy Governor Clinton, President
            The Honble Jonathan Lawrence, William B. Whiting, Johns Haring (Esquires Members)
            The following persons being commissioned officers in the Regiment of Artillery of this State in the Service of the United States whereof John Lamb Esquire is colonel and entitled to promoition.
            Resolved that by and with the advice and consent of the Council of Appointment Thomas Machin be and he is hereby appointed a Captain in the Said Regiment vice Jeremiah Wool resigned and that his commission bear date the 21st day of August 1780.”

State of New York
Secretary’s Office
            I certify the preceding to be a true Extract from the minutes of the Council of Appointment of this State in this Office.
            Given under my hand and the seal of this Office at the City of Albany the 6th day of April A. D. 1838.  Archd Campbell, Dep. Secretary

Charleston 22 February 1810
Honored Sir
            You was so kind as to asist me in the session of congress to obtain a small pension which amounted to quarter pay of a Captain Lieutenant of Artillery.  I think your Excellence must remember that I did the duty of a Captain during the warand that in addition to all the hard service I underwent I inlisted a great number of men into the service. I am unable to transact business as heretofore.  Therefore Request if consistent with your Honor & Duty you will assist me in getting my pension augmented so as to enable me to live in something like the style I have All (sic) ways suported my self.
            I am honored sir your excellent humble servant,  Thomas Machin
His Excellence George Clinton

State of New York
Montgomery County SS.
             John Bartlett of the town of Canajoharie in the County of Montgomery & State aforesaid being duly sworn says that he was Fifty Eight Years old in October last—that he has been personally acquainted with Thomas Machin of Charlestown in said County & State from the time deponent was a lad of ten or twelve years old up to the time of the death of the said Thomas Machin which took place in April 1816 at Charles Town aforesaid—that this deponent during all the time aforesaid lived within four miles of the said Machin that it was always understood in the neighborhood where he lived that the said Thomas had been an officer in the Revolutionary War, and that it was understood that he was wounded in the said war—that this deponent was also personally & intimately acquainted with Susan Machin the wife of the said Thomas that they lived together during all the time aforesaid as man & wife & that the said Susan Machin remained the widow of the said Thomas until her death which took place in December 1836—and this deponent further says that he was intimately acquainted with the family of the said Thomas Machin & Susan Machin now deceased and that Thomas Machin of Charlestown in the County and State aforesaid is the only child of the said Thomas Machin & Susan Machin now decd—that is now living—and this deponent further says that he never knew any other Thomas Machin except the two above mentioned—and this deponent further says that he has understood from the said Thomas Machin & the said Susan Machin before their deaths that they were married before the close of the Revolutionary War--& further says not—(Signed John Bartlett
            Subscribed & Sworn this 3rd day of April 1838 before me D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts
            State of New York Montgomery County SS.  I certify that I am personally acquainted with the above named John Bartlett & that he is reputable & entitled to full credit as a witness—Dated Canajoharie April 3d 1838.  D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.

State of New York
Montgomery County SS.
            Matilda Bartlett of the town of Canajoharie in the County aforesaid being duly sworn says that she was Forty nine years old in March last—that she was personally acquainted with Thomas Machin of the town of Charlestown in the County of Montgomery &^b State of New York for several years before his death—that this deponent resided within about four miles of the said Thomas Machin now deceased and that he the said Thomas Machin died more than twenty years since at his residence in Charlestown aforesaid—That this deponent also personally knew the wife of the said Thomas Machin now deceased for many years, and that her name was Susan Machin—that she remained a widow after the death of her husband until the day of her death & that she died in the month of December 1836 and was buried on the 1st of January 1837 & that this deponent was at the funeral of the said Susan Machin—and this deponent further says that Thomas Machin of Charlestown in said County & State is the only child now living of the said Thomas Machin & Susan Machin deceased was reputed in his life time to have been an officer in the Revolutionary War and she believed this it was reputed that he the decd Thomas Machin was a pensioner before his death—and this deponent further says that she never knew or heard of [?] other Thomas Machin except the two above named in this location of Country or elsewhere & further said that she is infirm and unable to attend court to make this affidavit--& further says not.—
(Signed) Matilda Bartlett
            Subscribed & Sworn this 3rd day of April 1838 before me—D. F . Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.
            State of New York Montgomery County SS.  I certify that I am personally acquainted with the above named Matilda Bartlett & that he is reputable & entitled to full credit as a witness—Dated Canajoharie April 3d 1838.  D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.

State of New York
Montgomery County SS. 
            Joshua Colgrove of the town of Charlestown in County and State aforesaid being duly sworn says that he was fifty six years old in August last.  That this deponent has been personally acquainted with Thomas Machin now deceased for many years before his death and that deponent lived for several years before his death within three quarters of a mile of the said Thomas Machin—that it was always understood in the neighborhood where he lived that said Thomas Machin had been an officer in the Revolutionary War & that he was badly wounded in said service—and that it was reputed that said Machin was put on the pension list before his death—and that the said Thomas Machin died in the Month of April 1816--& that this deponent was at his funeral—And this deponent says that he also was personally acquainted with Susan Machin the wife of the said Thomas Machin dedd and that they lived together as man & wife until the death of the said Thomas & that the said Susan the wife of the said Thomas, remained a widow until her death which took place in December 1836—This deponent further says that he was intimately acquainted with the family of the said Thomas Machin & Susan Machin and that Thomas Machin of Charlestown in said County & State is the only child of the said Thomas Machin & Susan Machin now deceased, now living and that this deponent never knew any other Thomas Machin except the tow above named in Charlestown or Elsewhere.  (Signed) Joshua Colgrove.
            Subscribed & Sworn this said 3rd day of April 1838 before me—D. F . Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.
            State of New York Montgomery County SS.  I certify that I am personally acquainted with the above named Joshua Colgrove & that he is reputable & entitled to full credit as a witness—Dated Canajoharie April 3d 1838.  D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.

State of New York
Montgomery County SS
            Ruth Yost of the town of Johnstown in the County and State aforesaid being duly sworn says that she was Sixty four years of age in the month of December last—That she has been personally acquainted with Thomas Machin & Susan Machin of the town of Charleston in the County and State aforesaid ever since the Revolutionary War—that during the Revolutionary War she this deponent resided at Huntington on Long Island in the State of New York—She further says that Susan Machin before her marriage to Thomas Machin now deceased was Susan Van Nostrand and that she the said Susan & her father James Van Nostrand resided during the Revolutionary War on the Island aforesaid. That the said Susan when married was at her Brother in Laws at Goshen in Orange County in said State—and this deponent further says that said Thomas Machin was Aunt to this deponent and deponent has a distinct recollection that after it was reputed that said Thomas Machin and the said Susan were married and whilst this deponent was a small girl the said Thomas said Susan came to the house of deponent on the Island aforesaid on a visit and this deponent has no doubt of the fact that when the said Thomas Machin & the said Susan his wife were at her fathers house as aforesaid as man & wife was before the close of the Revolutionary War—And this deponent further says that she has always understood that the said Thomas Machin was an officer in the Revolutionary War—That the said Thomas & Susan had but two children one a Girl by the name of Phebe & the other a son by the name of Thomas & that Phebe was the oldest of the two and that she the said Phebe is now dead, and that the said Thomas Machin the son of the said Thomas Machin deceased—That the said Thomas Machin & the said Susan Machin have always since the said Revolutionary War & since this deponent first saw them as man and wife lived together as man & wife up to the time of the death of the said Thomas Machin & that the said Susan remained the widow of the said Thomas with her death--& further says not.  (Signed) Ruth Yost
            Subscribed & Sworn this 5th said of April 1838 before me D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.
            State of New York Montgomery County SS.  I certify that I am personally acquainted with the above named Ruth Yost & that he is reputable & entitled to full credit as a witness—Dated Canajoharie April 5th 1838.  D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.

State of New York
Montgomery County SS
            Thomas Machin of the town of Charlestown in the County and State aforesaid being duly sworn says that he was fifty two years old on the 17th day of July last—that he is the sole surviving child of Thomas & Susan Machin now deceased and named in the annexed paper and letter.  That this deponent never had but one sister who was named Phebe who was about one year and eight months older than this deponent & who is now dead—That after the most dilligent search this deponent has not been able to find any record of the marriage of his father & mother except what is contained in the annexed letters nor has this deponent after the most diligent search been able to find any living witness who was present at the marriage of this deponents father & mother aforesaid, nor does this deponent believe that there is any person now living who was present at their marriage—This deponent says that he said Father & Mother have repeatedly during their life time told this deponent that they were married by a clergymen by the name of Lockwood at the House of one Timothy Dunning at Goshen in the County of Orange & State of New York on the 22nd day of August 1782—which this deponent believes to be true; and this deponent knows that ever since he had any recollections his said Father & Mother lived together as man & wife up to the day of the death of this deponents father and that the deponents father Thomas Machin died at Charlestown aforesaid on the 3rd day of April 1816—and this deponent further says that his mother Susan Machin & the wife of the said Thomas Machin decd remained his widow up to the day of her death which took place at the place aforesaid on the 28th day of December 183[blot]  And this deponent further says that there was an entry of the marriage of his Father & Mother aforesaid in an old family bible to them belonging in their life time made in the hand writing of deponents Father but that the same was about ten years since destroyed probably by this deponents children—and that it is not now to be produced but this deponent has a distinct recollection that it was there stated that they this deponents Father & Mother were married on the 22nd day of August 1782—And this deponent further says that the annexed letter and papers were found by this deponent amongst the paper of deponents Father left by him at the time of his death and this deponent has no doubt but that there were written at the time they purport to be and that they are true & genuine papers—and this deponent says that no information can be obtained although he has made delegent search of the said Lockwood who married his this deponents Father & Mother--& that the Durning family when they were married as aforesaid are as deponent has been informed & believes all dead except on son of about the same age of deponent—and deponent further says that his Father Thomas Machin is the same Thomas Michin who was put on the Pension Roll in 1808—and when pension was raised in 1814 and that it also appears from paper & commission in possession of deponent & found amongst the paper of deponents father that deponents father served as Captain of Artillery & Engineer during the Revolutionary War—and further says not—(Signed) Thomas Machin
            Sworn & Subscribed this 5th Day of April 1838 before me.  D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts
            State of New York Montgomery County SS.  I certify that I am personally acquainted with the above named Thomas Machin & that he is reputable & entitled to full credit as a witness—Dated Canajoharie April 5th 1838.  D. F. Sacia Judge of Montgomery County Courts.

State of New York
Schohary County  Carlisle May 15th 1839.
Sir
            I now enclose you sundary affidavits in support of the application of Captain Matthias Brown of the Tryon County Militia, of this state for a pension for his revolutionary services.  Application was made to you some years since by a Wm. Parkison for a pension for Captain Brown.  For drew up Captain Browns declaration by the name of John M. Brown.  Some of the affidavit ensiled fully explain the difference, and show that Matthias Brown is the same identical man with John M. Brown.  & the affidavits are verified except the one of Thomas Thompson taken before Judge Hammond, the first Judge of Otsego County who tells me his hand writing is verified and is in your office.
            I also enclose you sundary affidavits with certain documents from New Jersey, in support a pension for the widow Ninel Van Dorn widow of Christian Van Dorn a Militia soldier in the New Jersey Militia in the revolutionary war, those two cases I will thank you to investigate immediately and apprise me of your decision.
            I deem it my duty to inform you that it is generally believed among us that the pension named drawn last year by Thomas Matchin for his fathers revolutionary service, has been obtained through fraud and perjury.  She witnessed who aided him resides near me.  If  you will furnish me with copies of the affidavits on which that pension was granted, I will immediately inform you whether all is right or wrong.  I was intimate with Captain Machin and his wife and their son Thomas resided near me.  If the pension is rightfully obtained, then all will be right so far, but he has refused to pass over any part to the other heirs of  Captain Machin or Mrs. Matchin.  It is understood here that Thomas Matchin received $4000 to which his mother would have been entitled, as the widow of Captain Matchin, his mother was buried Three years ago last New Years day.  I was at her funeral with some part of my family.  Respectfully yours.  Henry S. Yates.

Washington D. C. Dec. 9, ‘39
Dr. Sir.
            Do me the favor of sending me answers to the interrogations of Wm. Cuming at your earliest convenience & with as much [?] as possible.
            You will readily perceive the importance of them I know “Thom Machin” well he is a “Case.”
            Let me also ask the like attention to enclose Letter of Wm. T. Candal.
            Respectfully Yours & c.  P. J. Wagner

Johnstown April 30, 1840
Dear Sir,
            Yours the 22d received.  In relation to the case of Thomas Matchin, I remember that in 1838 while I was acting as Surrogate of Montgomery county the said Matchin called on me with several affidavits in relation to the pension you mention.  He also made before me an affidavit reaffirming what was stated in the other affidavits presented and thereupon I gave him a certificate that the facts stated in the affidavits were satisfactorily proven.  I cannot now recollect what was the substance of the affidavits and certificates.  I have not now the papers belonging to said Surrogate’s Office, but I think I so recollect that when about to file the affidavits that Matchin objected, saying that he must have them all to forward to Washington.  I think I offered to certify to him copies of the same, but that he said none buy the originals would answer to be forwarded, and that thereupon he took them as he said for the purpose of forwarding the same.
            What will your House? Do with Garland & Byrum—I think an expulsion or two would enable you to progress [?] greatly.  The scene you [?] was [?] disgraceful.  Your truly T. A. Stoughenburgh.  Hon P. J. Wagner.

Canajoharie May 27, 1840
Dear Sir,
            Since mailing an answer to yours concerning a letter from the Pension Department and enquiring as to the time of the late Widow Matchin’s Decease, I have received a communication from Mr. David Chambers of Carlisle stating that she died on the 28th December 1835 and that Mrs. Germain the sister of T. Matchin died in March 1837.
            Mr. Chambers resides in the immediate vicinity where those persons lived and died and is undoubtedly correct.  Besides I have had a personal interview with a Mr. William Chambers of the same place and he is confident that the statement of David Chambers is correct.
            I am greatly obliged for the several papers and documents you have been kind enough to send me.
            Judge Eacker is extremely low and can survive, as it is tho’t but a very short time.  Yours truly L. Wilcox.  Hon. P. J. Wagner.

I have a cert. In this case payable to Thomas Machen only surviving child of Susan Machen, Decd widow of Capt. Thomas Machen $600 per annum to be paid up to Dec. 1, 1836, when she died.
            Deliver the certificate to Mr. Machen present.  Albany Agency.

Fort Plain August 4, 1840
Dear Sir,
            I have seen Mr. Thomas Machin & he says to me if the original Papers, on file in your office upon which he drew the money, are delivered over to me for him, he will pay over the cash—that is to say, he will then trust definitively with me—What say you to this?
            I can see no objection to this, and if consistent or proper, I wish you would send them to me, to deliver in case I receive the money.
            I have written Mr. Benton that I was negotiating for this case with me immediately.  Your humble & obedt servt.  P. J. Wagner

Fort Plain, N.Y.  August 6, ‘40
Dr. Sir.
            The letter you just recd from me was written in presence of Machin.  He is not aware of 2 years limitation & hence whishes the Papers.  Perhaps it may be well.
            Be over time & that debt be recurred by Montg. Over real estate or Judgt—I suppose & am sure indeed he cannot pay before the 18th.  Inst.  – If you think it better to take security by Judge for Montg. Than to prosecute himfor the money with me—if so, I will not be consistent & approbation of Benton, U.S.D. Atty—I would insist on paid money at least—of thought expedient give us full discretion.  I knew I would bring him to his “Mil R”? & I will bring him to the “Mark” (with interest?) Truly yours, P. J. Wagner.  Answer this directly & oblige him & me.

U. S. Attys Office
Utica N.Y. 16 Sept. 1841.
Sir,
            In the case of Thomas Machin, I desire to be furnished with authentic evidence of the fact, that on the 5th May 1838, the sum of $3,444.28 was paid him by the Pension Agency at Albany.
            Will you also furnish me the name of the Agency at Albany at that time.
            I am Sir, Very respectfully, P. A. Spencer, U.S. Atty
Hon. Charles B. Penrose, Soln of the Treasury

Office of the Solicitor of the Treasury
Sept 20th 1841.
Sir,
            I enclose herewith a copy of a letter just received from the Attorney of the United States for the Northern District of New York, in relation to the case of the United States vs Thomas Machin, for money fraudulently obtained at the Pension Agency in Albany New York.
            I shall be obliged by your furnishing this office at your earliest convenience with the evidence required by the Attorney and also with the name of the agency at Albany in May 1838.
Very Respectfully yours.  B. F. Hensants Clk, Off. of Soln of Treas’y
To James L. Edwards, Esqr, Comm of Pensions.

Albany 21, Jan 1842
J. L. Edwards, Esq.
            Sir, We have finally succeeded in arresting Thomas Machin and holding him to bail at the suit of the United States in a suit to recover back the three thousand & three hundred of dollars obtained from the Gov’t by a fraud on the pension laws.  He called on me at this place yesterday and proposed to give a Judgment from the amount and interest provided he could have time [?] to pay it in five annual installments with annual interest—The price with int. now due must be over $4000.  The Judgt will use a loan on a farm of about four hundred acres in Montgomery County near the probability fix of seven thousand dollars in that a Land times, he says he owes about two thousand dollars besides near [?] on the farm & he gives this among other reasons why it will be out of his power to pay the Govt & [?]
            Will the Department inform me what I shall do in the matter?
            I will remain in the city circuit the close of Next week & [?] I shall return to Utica.  With High regard, I have the honor to be your obt servt.  J. A. Spencer.

Carlisle Schoharie Co.  November 11th 1847
James L. Edwards, Esqr
            Sir        
            It is supposed that Thomas Machin obtained some arrears of Pension ;amounting to over $3000 as heir at Law of his mother who was widow of Thomas Machin a Captain in the war of the revolution.
            The old Lady died in December 1835 but it appears that he procured some ignorant persons to make affidavit that she died a year after [?] to bring the claim within the act passed I believe in 1836—It is evident that subornation of perjury was committed and if he obtained the pension in this case upon such evidence a gross fraud was perpetuated upon government.  I wish to procure from the proper department information & authentic called as to be evidence in a court of Justice.
            Will you be pleased to forward to me by mail such information as may be in your possession at your earliest convenience.  Very Respectfully,  Geo. Bowne

October 13, 1911.
Hon. Eben. W. Martin
House of Representatives
My dear Mr. Martin:
            In response to your personal request of the 12th instant, I have the honor to advise you that the papers in claim, Wid. File No. 17,081, Rev. War, show that Thomas Machin was appointed, August 21, 1780, Captain of Colonel John Lamb’s regiment, Continental Artillery, length and particulars of service not stated and he was pensioned for wound of breast.
            It is further alleged that he married at Goshen, New York, August 22, 1782, Susanna Van Nostrand daughter of James Van Nostrand; died April 3, 1816, at Charlestown, New York, leaving widow Susanna, and Phebe 1 year and 3 month older than Thomas born July 17, 1764, who were their only children.  Very respectfully, First Deputy Commissioner.
           
New York State SS.
            Doctor Oliver Lothrop of the City of Albany and Doctor Jonathan Eights of the same place, appointed and authorized by Matthew B. Tallmadge Dist. Judge & c. to examine Capt. Thomas Machin, who is inscribed on the pension list of the United States and is claimant for an increase of pension, being duly sworn report, that on an examination of the said Captn Thomas Machin on oath, as to the nature of his wound and in what degree it prevents him from obtaining his subsistence, by manual labour, and from an inspection of the wound in the breast of the said applicant, they are of opinion, that the debility thereby produced wholly prevents him from obtaining his subsistence by Manual Labour.  Albany Oct 29th 1814.  Oliver Lathrop; J. Eights.
            Sworn before me this 29th day of October 1813.
           
Increase of Pension
United States
            To Doctor Oliver Lothrop of City of Albany and Doctor Jonathan Eights of same place, in the New York said District.
            Pursuant to an Act of Congress of the United States, passed the 25th of April, 1812, entitled “An Act of revive and continue in force an act to provide for persons who were disabled by known wounds received in the Revolutionary War, and for other purposed”—You are hereby appointed and authorised to examine Capt. Thomas Machlin who is claimant for an increase of pension conformably to the 5th section of the act of the 10th of April, 1806, revived as aforesaid; and you are to report in writing and on oath or affirmation your opinion of the nature of his disability and in what degree it prevents him from obtaining a subsistence by manual labor; and in your proceedings in the premises you are to be relulated and governed by said act.
            Given under my hand and seal at New York this 8th day of October in the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen.  Matthias B. Tallmadge, Dist Judge.

[Handwriting is very shaky]
Charleston the 3d November 1814.
Honored Sir,
            I was placed on the pension list by an act of Congress in the year 1806 and During the Session of Congress in the year 1814 I made application for an Increase of pension but by means of my examining Doctors not making their report exact according to Law my application did not succeed.  If I am well informed the proceedings of my application stand recorded in the office I wish that your honor would examine the records and if it is found, lawfull that I am entitled to an Increase of pension from my first application I make no Doubt that you will forward the business in such a manner that I shall receive it in due time.
            I am honored sir your most humble servant Thomas Machin

Memorandum
            On examination of the roll of New York Invalid pensioners U.S. it appears that Capt. Machin was borne on it, at the rate of #10 per mo. To the 3d of March 1815 at which time his pension was increased to $20 per month, to commence on the 29th of October, 1814.  And therefore it is not in the power of the secretary of War to grant the increase from 4th March 1808 the only money in this case will be to memorial consays?

To James Monroe President of the United States.
            The petition of Susan Machin of the County of Schoharie in the State of New York respectfully requests.
            That her husband Thomas Machin was a Captain in Col. Lamb’s Regiment of Artillery during the Revolutionary War—that he served with [?] and [?] and died on the 3d April 1816 leaving your petitioner and his children in destitute circumstances.
            That in consequence of wounds received during the war, a pension was granted to her late husband on the 4th day of March 1808 at the rate of ten dollars per month—that it was extended to grant him 20 dollars per month, at the War Office but in consequence of some [?] in the Surgeon’s report the Committee of Pensions reduced him from to ten dollars—that on the 29th of October 1914 his [?] was [?] and from that period he was allowed twenty dollars per month until the termination of his life—That this provision [can’t read a sentence] 4th March 1808 but owing to some unfortunate misapprehension it did not take palce.
            [Can’t read last paragraph.]  (Signed) Susanna Machin

New York
            Mrs. Susanna Machin, applies for arrearage of pension which she states was justly due her late husband Capt. Thomas Machin & late an Invalid Pensioner of the U.S.  It appears that the said Thos Machin, was placed on the Pension list of the U.S. by Law of 25th April 1808 at $10 per mo. to commence on the 19th Mar. 1808 and was increased to $20 per month to commence on the 29th October 1814 by law 3d March 1815.
            It farther appears from notes made on a Journal kept in the Pension Office, in March 1812, that the date of the certificate of the examining surgeons (by inference from which it would appear that the party was totally disabled) was dated 19th March 1812 however this certificate not being considered sufficient the form a subsequent application was made as appears by the accompanying papers, on which the increase of $20 per month was granted by Congress, to commence on the 29th Oct. 1814, the day on which the second examination was made by the surgeons.
            The widow of the deceased pensioner now claims the arrearages which might be justly due to her husband if he was living at this time, which would appear to be at the rate of $10 per month from the 19th March 1812, (the day on which the first examination took place, in consequence of his application for an increase of pension;) to the 29th October 1814, and not from March 1808 as the applicant supposes.  War Department Pension Office, Novr 7th 1818.

New York  Mrs. Susanna Machin an applicant for arrearage of increase of pension due her late husband Capt. Thomas Machin, as an Invalid Pensioner U.S. Continental  Art.
            The arrear which the party appears to claim is at the rate of $10 per month from 19th March 1812 to the 29th of October 1814.  Award of Congress.  Nov. 30, 1818.          

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