Morrison's Pensions


Pension Application for Hermon Peters

S.11224
Declaration, in order to obtain the act of Congress, passed June 7, 1832.
State of New York
Saratoga County, SS.
            On this sixth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty two personally appeared in open court, before the court of Common Pleas of the county of Saratoga and State of New York now sitting, Hermon Peters, a resident of Charlton in the county of Saratoga, and State New York aged Seventy years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth, on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832.
            That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein stated.
            He was born in the Town of Schenectady in the then county of Albany and State of New York May 17, 17[?].  He has no record of his age.  [Charlton crossed out and Glenville written above.] In the county of Saratoga and State of New York & to Walter Maxwell, Thomas Sweetman, William Taylor Eleasa Dows, Esquires of the town of Charlton –I the County of Saratoga and State of New York who can certify to his character for veracity & their belief of his services as a Revolutionary soldier.  That during the Revolutionary War he resided in the Town of Schenectady (now City) in the then county of Albany now Schenectady in the State of New York, and that since the Revolutionary War he has resided at the said town of Schenectady in the county of Schenectady & State of New York and in the town of Charlton in the County of Saratoga and State of New York and that he now resides in the Town of Charlton in the county of Saratoga and State of New York.
            He resided in the Town Schenectady & county of Albany when in September 1778 he volunteered with the Oneida Indians and was out twenty days in search of Joe Bettys—he started from Schenectady at the time aforesaid with twenty six Oneida Indians and five white men & marched from Schenectady to Socendaga [Sacondaga] River and crossed about a mile below the Fish house and scouted through the woods to the Canada line in search of the said Joe that five white man deserted before crossing Socendaga River the Scout was commanded by Capt. Arnold an Indian and returned home scouting through the wood in different direction and served just twenty days.
            And that in the spring of 1779, went under Captain Banker of the Militia of Schenectady to  Beaver Dam on a Scout and took at Beaver dam seven Tories who were secreted there in a barn and in a cellar and returned and lodged them in Albany Jail, he served four days on the tour to Beaver Dam.
            And that in April 1779 he entered the service of the Revolution as a private under Lieutenant Fonda in Col. Wemple’s Regiment of the Militia of Schenectady as a volunteer, marched from Schenectady to fort Plain in order to keep guard and continued there to do duty there as a private on guard at Fort Plain aforesaid under the aforesaid Lieutenant Fonda who commanded the Garrison which consisted of about sixty men.  Which composed the whole gar and served for the term of Two months, and was dismissed by the said Lieutenant Fonda.  He has no discharge in writing was dismissed at fort Plain.  He has no documentary or other evidence of his said services.
            That in March 1780 he entered the service again as a volunteer under Captain Jesse Van Slyck of a militia company of the Town of Schenectady that he joined the company at Schenectady consisting of about thirty men and marched to Stone Arabia under the command of said Captain Jesse VanSlyck and continued there about one month on guard and was released by Col. Willett at Stone Arabia and returned home he has no Dockumentary [sic] evidence of his said service.
            That he resided at the Town of Schenectady in the County of Albany and State of New York when he entered into the service of the Revolution, as volunteer private of the company of Militia of Schenectady commanded by Captain John Mynderse being a company dressed in uniform that the said company mustered on the 22nd of Dec’r 1777 and served for three months in manner following he with the said company went on Guard at the Picketts of said Town of Schenectady about  the 10th January 1778 and he stood on guard in his regular turn, to guard against the enemy and her served as aforesaid until the tenth day of April following and was dismissed by Col. Abraham Wemple at the Pickets aforesaid he has no discharge in writing he has no dockumentary evidence of his said services.  The garrison consisted of about one hundred men.
            Soon after he returned from the aforesaid twelve men were required out is his company in order to go to Schoharie to keep guard that he as one of the twelve with eleven others was drafted to go to Schoharie to keep guard they marched from Schenectady to Schoharie about the 15th of May 1778 and he served on guard as a private under Captain Mynderse who commanded the guard consisting of about 60 or 70 men.  Alexander McKinsie that he served six weeks and was dismissed by the said Captain Mynderse at Schoharie and returned home to Schenectady.  He continued only one day at home when he engaged to serve six weeks more as a substitute for his father Herman Peers who was called to a like service of six weeks by draft, he then returned to Schoharie and served under Captain Mynderse aforesaid until about ten days before his term of six weeks was expired when Captain Swart took command of the guard that he served under Captain Swart until the Expiration of the said six weeks making in all twelve weeks he was dismissed by Captain Swart at Schoharie.  He has no discharge in writing.  He has no dockumentary evidence of his said services.
            That he resided at Schenectady aforesaid when he entered the service in the year 1778 he was on Scouts nine different times with the Indians Oneidas in search of the enemy he with the Indians marched through Remsen Bush & Warren’s with from 6 to 8 Indians he was the only white man in the Scout.  They required his service as being well acquainted with the Country he served in this way with the Indians about nine weeks his Scouting company took one Indian Prisoner at Remsen’s Bush and brought him home to Schenectady & delivered him to the authority.
            In the spring 1780 he was ordered by VanSlyck to fort Paris near Stone Arabia that he marched under Captain Vrooman to Herkimer that he continued there to keep guard and other duties as a private for two months under the command of the said Captain Myer that the guard consisted of about thirty men he was dismissed by the said Captain being relieved by col. Dayton’s Regiment.  He was discharged at Fort Herkimer aforesaid.  He has no written discharge, he has no dockumentary or other evidence of his said services.
            In march 1781 he entered the service as a volunteer the company commanded by Walter Swits was raised at Schenectady William Lighthall was Ensign of the company.  It consisted of forty six men raised in order to keep guard at Forts Volunteer and Fort Squash at Schenectady.  The company was divided twenty three men to each fort.
            He this deponent entered as a volunteer and served at Fort Volunteer as a private of said company under Captain Mynderse commanding said Guard.  That he served in this way for the period of eleven months from the time aforesaid and was dismissed by Captain Mynderse—aforesaid he has no discharge in writing.  He has no dockumentary evidence of his aforesaid services.
            That in the fall of the year 1782 he served with the Oneida Indians at Jessup’s patent John Van Ingen was the only white man in the company he this deponent was scouting after tories and deserters from the American Service and continued on this scout thirty six days, the Scout consisted of Ten Indians and white men the said John VanIngen and this Application Captain Arnold an Indian commanded the Scout we went out by order of Colonel Abraham Wemple.  He was dismissed he had no discharge in writing was discharged by Captain Arnold, he has no dockumentary evidence.   He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any State, or (f any) only on that of the agency of the State of [blank]  (Signed) Hermon Peters
            Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open court.  Thomas Palmer, Clerk

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