Morrison's Pensions


DIARY OF CAPTAIN BENJAMIN WARREN

            About the first of November Gen. Hand, who was ordered to the command of the Northern Department came to direct us to determine on the expediency of quartering the troops here the winter.  He called for a return of what ordinance stores, amunition, &c, I had in the garrison; meanwhile an express arrived from Fort Stanwix, informing that one of the Oneidas was at a Council of war of the enemy's, in which it was determined to visit Cherry Valley.  The General had the regiment turned out and reviewed them; he payed us a high compliment in orders and in consequence of the express, he went down and ordered Col. Klock to send immediately 200 men to reinforce us, which the Gen. wrote was to have been here the 9th of November and ordered up a large quantity of provision and amunition stores, which however did not come to hand nor any reinforcement of men and on Wednesday, the 11th, about 12 o'clock, the enemy to the number of 650, rushed upon us, surrounded headquarters and the fort immediately and pushed vigorously for the fort, but our soldiers behaved with great spirit and alertness; defended the fort and repulsed them, after three hours and half smart engagement.  Col. Alden in endeavouring to reach the fort was killed; Col. Stacy made prisoner together with Lieut. Holden, Ensign Garrett, the surgeon's mate, and a serjeant, about 12 or 14 off the regiment: twelve of the regiment besides the Col. killed and two wounded.
            November 12th.  No reinforcements till about 9 or 10 o'clock.  The Indians came on again and gave a shout for rushing on, but our cannon played brisk; they soon gave away: they then went round the settlement burnt all the buildings mostly the first day and collected all the stock and drove the most of it off; killed and captivated all the inhabitants, a few that hid in the woods excepted, who have since got into the fort.
            November 13th.  In the afternoon and morning of the 13th we sent out parties after the enemy withdrew; brought in the dead; such a shocking sight my eyes never beheld before of savage and brutal barbarity; to see the husband mourning over his dead wife and four dead children lying by her side, mangled, scalpt, and some their heads, some their legs and arms cut off, some torn the flesh off their bones by their dogs -- 12 of one family killed and four of them burnt in his house.
            Saturday 14th.  The enemy seemed to be gone; we sent out to collect what was left of cattle or anything; found some more dead and buried them.
            Sunday 15th.  This day some provision arrived being the first supply after the first attack when we had not a pound for man in garrison, for four or five days, but a trifle of meat.  In the afternoon a scout we thought had been taken by them, a serjeant and eight men arrived in safe.  By some they took prisoners they let go again; informed they had a number wounded and we saw a number of them fall, so that we have reason to think we killed more of them than they killed of our regiment, though they butchered about 40 women and children that had been found.  It came on to storm before the engagement began: first with rain, but for this day past, it has been a thick snow storm.

            Monday 16th.  The snow continued falling & is almost knee deep on a level.  --  The Col. was buried the 13th with -- -- -- under arms with all the honors of war. -- Though there was 300 men, between this and the river, most of them together before we were attacked, yet they came within four miles and laid there until they were assured the enemy was gone off.  Col. Butler, though near 40 miles off, marched and got near and, would have been the first to our assistance, had we not sent him word they were gone off:  we are here in a shocking situation, scarcely an officer that has anything left, but what they have on their back.

SOURCE: JOURNAL OF AMERICAN HISTORY  III, 1909, pp 201-216, 377-384,
DIARY OF CAPTAIN BENJAMIN WARREN.

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